Dependency Logic based on one or the other predecessor tasks

10/12/21
Answered - Pending Review

Is is possible to create schedule logic where a dependent task is dependent on one of two predecessors (either or not both)? For Example:

I am trying to build out a schedule template for if a permit is required vs not for a specific project. IF a permit is required then the rest of the schedule should be based on the duration to submit and receive permits, IF a permit is NOT required than I would like the rest of the schedule to skip over the permit submission tasks and then every downstream task would be released based on the start date in the row for NO PERMIT REQUIRED but if I make them both predecessors to the next tasks and I remove dates or enter N/A for the permit required tasks it removes the logic all together, it doesn't default to the other predecessor.



Answers

  • Hi @Megcald17

    There currently isn't a way to set a conditional predecessor as you've described, with two possible task items based on a condition. Please let the Product Team know about your request by filling in this form, here!

    The way I would personally set this up is to have all the following tasks linked to the final "Permit Released" task so that your sheet is based on the assumption that a permit will be required.

    Then if you know that it's not required, when you change the status to "Cancelled" or "N/A", I would also adjust the Duration for each task to be 0, with the Predecessors changed to be based on the "Permits Not Required" row.

    This will then have all the following tasks based off of that "Not Required" row, since the Cancelled rows are now adjusted to be based on that row.


    For example, if I had this sheet (permit section highlighted in blue), with the first "Following Task" linked to "Permit Released" (see yellow cells):


    Then the orange cells are what I would update to have the Following Task essentially be after the Permit Not Required. It's still linked to Task 3, but now Task 3 is immediately after Permit Not Required instead of being at a later date:


    Let me know if this makes sense and if you think it will work for you!

    Cheers,

    Genevieve

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